Session Descriptions


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( A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z )



Adaptation Strategies in Transnational Education: A Case Study of a Sino-Australian MHA Program

Presenter(s):
Chaojie Liu, La Trobe University
Qunhong Wu, Harbin Medical University
Zhanming Liang, La Trobe University
Leila Karimi, La Trobe University
Adamm Ferrier, La Trobe University
Jane Sheats, La Trobe University
Hanan Khalil ,La Trobe University
 
Session Description:
Management decisions in health influence patient care outcomes; however, there is a shortage of well-trained management workforce in the health industry due to a lack of management development courses. This study aimed to evaluate a Master of Health Administration (MHA) course jointly run by an Australian university and a Chinese medical university for Chinese health managers.

Adaptation strategies for the curriculum were summarised, followed by a questionnaire survey of 139 graduates. Respondents were asked to rate the degree of relevance, satisfaction and challenges of each subject within the course, importance of key management skills required by the Australasian College of Health Service Management competency framework.

The curriculum pedagogy followed the principles of practice-based reflective learning. Students first need to develop a thorough understanding of management essentials, including workforce, policy, information, and health economics before learning how to strengthen their management competencies through further studies. Each of the foundation subjects leads to subjects that build on these topics in relation to health systems, population health, information management, resource management, organisational management, and safety and quality. The capstone subject Action Learning Project adopts a reflective learning strategy, requiring students to improve their usual behaviours and practices through a supervised project and self-reflecting. High levels of relevance and satisfaction of all study subjects were rated by the participants. The health economics and data management subjects were perceived as most challenging. Of the ten management skills assessed, relatively low self-rated confidence was found in “strategic thinking” and “planning”.

This case study illustrates the suitability of cross-country partnerships in health management training, which can offer an opportunity for managers to systematically learn a comprehensive set of management skills applicable to their functions and roles. Research-informed adaptation of the curriculum is critical.
 
 



Analyzing Social Determinants of Health and Community Needs Assessment: A Virtual Approach

 
Presenter(s):
William Opoku-Agyeman, University of North Carolina at Wilmington
Soumya Upadhyay, University of Nevada at Las Vegas
Seongwon Choi, Trinity University
Randyl Cochran, Towson University
 
Session Description:
In this session, we'll discuss how each graduate program (UNCW, Trinity and UNLV) has incorporated Community Needs Assessment to the coursework and used it as a gateway to emphasize the implications of social determinants of health to managing health care organizations virtually. We will provide examples of how student projects and capstones are used to incorporate knowledge and research skills on social determinants of health through community needs assessment across in a virtual work:
-Health organization and policy;
-Strategic planning course; and
-Essentials Health and Human Disease.


 
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Bridging the Gap: Strategies for Successful Transitions from Classrooms to the Industry


Presenter(s):
Mark Bush, University of Central Florida
Shannon Elswick, University of Central Florida
Kourtney Nieves, University of Central Florida
 
Session Description:
This session will share the lessons learned and success stories from a large metropolitan university in their efforts to engage their large student population with practicing industry professionals.  By leveraging the decades of experience of our executive in residence, our talented pool of adjuncts, the ACHE Student Advisory Board & Committee Council, our new student chapter of ACHE, and our voluntary mentor pods, we have been able to engage students with industry professionals through networking opportunities, shadowing, career and fellowship prep, etc.  The networking opportunities have been developed over the past five years from faculty, students and community, and each group's roles will be highlighted.  This will showcase how these unique efforts, together, have made a difference in student's lives and eventual career success.

 

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Broadening Undergraduate and Graduate Students Understanding of Global Health Systems


Presenter(s):
Gail Marcus, Hofstra University
 
Session Description:
This lecture/activity session will discuss the practice of incorporating global health system content into a first level course on the US healthcare system.  Through this approach, students are able to put the US health system in context.  This session will provide suggestions for integrating the content. At the completion of the session participants will be able to describe the benefits of incorporating global content and identify specific practices for incorporating global health content to enhance learning outcomes about the US health system.   The introduction to the US health system, the entry level course of most health administration and health science programs, Actively integrating a global perspective into this course enables students  to build a global versus US-centric frame of reference  of health systems.
 



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Building the Capacity of Hospital Managers in the Eastern Mediterranean Region

Presenter(s):
Hamid Ravaghi, Mohammad Bin Salman College of Business & Entrepreneurship
Joris Van de Klundert, Mohammad Bin Salman College of Business & Entrepreneurship

 
Session Description:
This lecture/activity session will discuss the practice of incorporating global health system content into a first level course on the US healthcare system.  Through this approach, students are able to put the US health system in context.  This session will provide suggestions for integrating the content. At the completion of the session participants will be able to describe the benefits of incorporating global content and identify specific practices for incorporating global health content to enhance learning outcomes about the US health system.   The introduction to the US health system, the entry level course of most health administration and health science programs, Actively integrating a global perspective into this course enables students  to build a global versus US-centric frame of reference  of health systems.
 
 


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Building Professional Readiness through Students and Faculty Interdisciplinary Collaboration using Grand Rounds.
 
Presenter(s):
Natalia Rekhter, Governors State University
 
Session Description:
This session describes the interdisciplinary work of faculty and students from eight health science departments, including health administration, aimed to provide students from these departments with an opportunity for inter-collegiate collaboration and for the acquisition of core interdisciplinary competencies before entering the workforce.  84 students were engaged in the online Grand Rounds Learning Experience that included a Panel Discussion with health and human service professionals, a simulation case with medical, financial, social, and other information, and small teams problem-solving activities.  This interdisciplinary collaboration allowed health administration students to gain clarity on the roles of other professionals in addressing complex real-life issues encountered in various healthcare settings.  It also better prepared them for Practicum experiences and for entering the workforce.


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Could Clubhouse Serve as an Alternative Conference Platform for Discussing Healthcare Issues, Innovations, and Improvements?

Presenter(s):
Natalia Rekhter, Governors State University
 
Session Description:

The Clubhouse is an iPhone-only, invitation-only conference-like application where any person can host a "room"- a conversation platform- and join other people's conversations.  In the time of the pandemic, having virtual conferences and discussion boards became essential parts of many people's lives; Clubhouse is a reflection of this changing reality.  There are no videos, no pictures, and no text, just audio conversations in any language among people from all over the world; nothing can be saved or played pack, and therefore, participants are not afraid of publicity.  

There are 10.1 million users on Clubhouse, including celebrities like Elon Musk and Bill Gates. Could Clubhouse be used as an education platform?  Could we have students discuss various healthcare topics among themselves and with experts in the field.  Could it serve as a bridge for discussions related to global healthcare issues? Dr. Anopchenko from Smolensk State University and Dr. Rekhter from Governors State University would share their experiences in having students and faculty discuss various healthcare issues at Clubhouse.  The presentation will highlight the class structure, challenges, teachable moments, and lessons learned. 

 

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COVID-19 Adjustments and Strategies in Education, Research, and Healthcare Management: Local and Global Experiences

Presenter(s):

Faina Linkov, PHD  Duquesne University
Fevzi Akinci, PhD, Duquesne University
Ahmad Khanijahani, PhD, CPH, CHDA, Duquesne University

Session Description:

The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with significant changes in practicing healthcare management, research and education. While online learning has taken place via several venues, helping student obtain experiential learning opportunities has been more problematic. In this workshop, we discuss several distance education solutions that were implemented to mitigate disruptions in the internship process at Duquesne University, the John G. Rangos, Sr. School of Health Sciences (RSHS).   We will also provide an overview of our innovative strategies in education delivery. Utilizing a student-centric approach, solutions focusing on diversified alternative learning opportunities through various technologies, including Zoom, Microsoft Teams, etc., which were implemented with the emphasis on collaboration among students, advisors, internship preceptors, and other stakeholders.  

New global health research collaboration opportunities opened up due to the pandemic, with our school starting new collaborations with Grenada- West Indies, China, Ukraine, Mexico, and Singapore. These collaborations focus on both remote collaboration opportunities (online conferences and workshops), as well as future in-person programs and student exchanges. In research, our department conducted secondary data analysis studies, focusing on COVID-19 pandemic data available from public sources to address health disparities and identify disproportionately impacted communities and population groups.


 

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Creating an Online Orientation/Introduction Course

 
Presenter(s):
Jessica Ryan, University of West Florida
 
Session Description:
Starting a fully online program or an in-person program that is temporarily online can be tough, particularly for older students who may have had a long break in school. This session details how an online orientation/introduction course was created for a MHA program as well as instructor and student feedback. The course focused on building engagement for students with both the course itself and with other students. Additionally, the course covered academic integrity, university resources, self-assessments, the inbound exam from Peregrine. The course also introduced the learning management system and had the students practice using proctoring software and creating video responses.
 


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Defining & Reframing Problems to Drive Healthcare Transformation: An Interactive Learning Session

 
Presenter(s):
Zachary Pruitt, University of South Florida
Justine Mishek, University of Minnesota
Rachel Haga, Virginia Commonwealth University
Sandra Potthoff, University of South Florida
 
Session Description:
Transforming the healthcare industry requires holistic problem definition and waves of divergent and convergent thinking to develop innovative and implementable solutions. The typical approaches that are used today reinforce the status quo; transformation needs innovative problem definition. In this interactive session, we will use a case vignette--that can be replicated in the classroom--to teach problem-definition skills. Through application, we will compare and contrast how problem-solving approaches, such as Lean, Six Sigma, Design Thinking, and the Minnesota Method, can be applied to transform the healthcare system.


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Demonstrating Innovative Teaching Methods in Healthcare Administration Education: Techniques in Virtual Learning

 
Presenter(s):
Sandra Murdock, Texas Womans' University
Frances Revere, University of Texas School of Public Health
Mark Phelps, University of Texas School of Public Health
 
Session Description:
A collection of virtual learning tools and techniques that have proven to be engaging and educational at UTSPH and TWU will be presented. Each tool has been successfully used to engage students, stimulate discussion and reinforce learning for our healthcare management students. We will demonstrate and facilitate discussion on strategies to implement and support competency-based e learning, including fostering collaboration, facilitating reflections, peer-based learning, and presentation skills..  Strategies will focus on tools and techniques that affect motivational and executive functions including; waterfall chat and reflection; team contracts to document roles, dates and times; and collaborate whiteboard. We build on innovative models of collaborative education, which meld competency-based curricula.


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Design of a Contemporary MHA

Presenter(s):
Hanan Khalil, La Trobe University
 
Session Description:
While there are several core competencies required in health administration programs, there is little known about how the core subjects taught in health administration programs are relevant to practice. This presentation describes an educational innovation to design a contemporary Master of Health Administration program to meet the current needs of health managers in Australia.

A detailed evaluation of various key stakeholders’ feedback was undertaken by faculty. Stakeholders surveyed in the course design included prospective students, international students’ agencies, prospective employers, Alumni evaluation, mapping of health managers courses in Australia and faculty feedback. Various themes were emerged from these consultations including the importance of  basic knowledge of key subjects and the significance of learning new skills such as strategic planning and emotional intelligence in the workplace.

The results of this intensive consultation led to the design of a contemporary Master of Health Administration Course that included eight core subjects and multiple options of specialisations for students to choose from. Examples of specialisations include aged care and ageing, health promotion, data for decision making, public health, international development and Health Strategy and decision making.


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Developing an AIT initiative to promote Leadership Development and Post-Acute Care collaboration.
 
Presenter(s):
Karla Diekemper, University of Southern Indiana
Kevin Valadares, University of Southern Indiana
 
Session Description:
Many states require licensed nursing home administrator candidates to complete an Administrator in Training (AIT) program prior to licensure. The University of Southern Indiana (USI) developed an innovative AIT initiative for health administration students and a certificate option for alumni and non-degree seeking candidates. The AIT initiative included a sponsored preceptor certification course for AIT mentors and collaborating with the State of Indiana Professional License agency and nursing home partners to develop the program. Initially the AIT initiative has been embedded in USI's Master of Health Administration program. The implementation process and barriers in development and executing the AIT initiative will shared.


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Developing Mechanisms to Incorporate DEIJ into Healthcare Management Curricula

 
Presenter(s):
Jennifer Hefner, Ohio State University
Kimberly Enard, Saint Louis University
Chris Louis, Boston University
Julie Robbins, Ohio State University
 
Session Description:
This session will be an interactive workshop in which participants will engage with the moderators and each other to collaboratively create content about the best practices for the inclusion of diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice (DEIJ) into program curricula. Moderators will briefly present the focus of this session and summarize efforts within their respective programs. We will then conduct a series of small group brainstorming activities to address the following questions: (1) What DEIJ issues (e.g., LGBTQ, racism) should be included in healthcare management program curricula? (2) What language can be used to develop a competency addressing DEIJ? (3) What are potential assessments for measuring DEIJ that may be used to determine competence (e.g., experiential learning, specific competencies)?
 


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Development of a Screen-Based Change Management Simulation for Health Professionals

Presenter(s):

Ashleigh Allgood, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Mohanraj Thirumalai, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Nancy Borkowski, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Session Description:
The presenters will describe the development of a screen-based change management simulation that was designed to effectively create a "real-world" experience for students in health professions related programs and practicing professionals to learn the needed skills necessary to be a successful change agent. Through this active learning experience, participants are able to internalize the skill-set needed to successfully lead change by optimizing stakeholder buy-in thereby minimizing resistance to the change initiative.

 
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Dissertation Process Innovation in Action: Pilot Project Guides Students Toward Scientific Maturity

 
Presenter(s):
Wittney Jones, Northcentral University
Linda Mast, Northcentral University
 
Session Description:
Doctoral faculty are held accountable for ensuring students "develop and demonstrate the necessary attributes for doctoral success" (Friedrich-Nel & Mac Kinnon, 2019). Guiding doctoral students toward scientific maturity begins with providing quality feedback that helps students learn how to pick a feasible topic, pose appropriate project questions, and support assertions with relevant literature. This session will share an innovative pilot project, by an online Doctor of Health Administration program, designed to support student success and contribute to scientific maturity. Through faculty collaboration, a Premise Review Committee and process were established. The intention of the committee is to offer DHA students the opportunity of periodic feedback outside the classroom so students are actively revising and refining their premise throughout the last half of their doctoral program.


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Doctoral Capstone Projects: Completion Factors Considered

 
Presenter(s):
Steven Berkshire, Central Michigan University
Asa Wilson, Southeast Missouri State University
 
Session Description:
The purpose of this study is to identify a personality type and/or motivation factors hypothesized to be aligned with or supportive of the cognitive demands posed by a doctoral dissertation. A retrospective questionnaire is used to capture self-reports from individuals who participated in doctoral health administration programs. Explanatory understanding of a failure-to-complete within doctoral health administration programs will be examined.


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Eliminating "Isms" of Ageism: Pivoting Health Administration Programs to Incorporate Age-Friendly Curriculum

 
Presenter(s):
Amy Dore, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Mary Helen McSweeney-Feld, Towson University
 
Session Description:
Ageism is one of the least acknowledged forms of prejudice with an estimated $63 billion per year in health costs (Levy et. al, 2020).  COVID -19 magnified ageist perspectives in health care service delivery.  Health administration programs can create curriculum changes to address these attitudes while meeting healthcare workforce needs. This presentation will illustrate how programs can benefit from an age-friendly curriculum. Session presenters represent two diverse AUPHA member universities, one from a non-traditional, urban university designated as a Hispanic-Serving Institute (HSI) with a highly diverse student body, and one from a Mid-Atlantic state university graduating the largest number of undergraduate health professionals in its state. Attendees will learn about age-friendly teaching tools and strategies and how to assess their impact on student learning outcomes.


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Emerging Challenges in Quality Management:  Leveraging Partners to Lead the Way

 
Presenter(s):
Karen Clancy, University of Kentucky
Sarah Kercsmar, University of Kentucky
Lisa Smurr-Walters, University of Kentucky
Bailey Fitzpatrick, Class of 2022, University of Kentucky

Session Description:
Recent legislative changes and fierce competition for market share has thrust health care quality, safety, and patient experience into main stream management strategies.  These changes are redesigning organizational structures and administrative practices at health care facilities across the country, compounded by the global pandemic. This session will present the methods used in an undergraduate health administration program to redesign the Quality Management course.  Review and redesign of course content is essential to prepare students for emerging trends. The use of industry, faculty, and student partners and their roles will be discussed.  The session will be delivered in a workshop format beginning with a lecture, followed by interactive discussions.  These methods may be used by participants to redesign coursework in other areas of study.
 

 
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Enhancing Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in the UW MHA Curriculum
 
Presenter(s):
Kurt O'Brien, University of Washington
Paul Fishman, University of Washington
Apoorva Somayazulu, University of Washington
Kush Doshi, University of Washington
 
Session Description:
The University of Washington has a story we would like to share with the broader MHA community. This is a story about our students exercising their personal leadership by partnering with faculty to ensure the topics of race, equity and inclusion are more fully incorporated within our courses, and to more thoroughly examine the issue of structural racism in healthcare. The Curriculum Advocacy Team (CAT) is comprised of students who have a passion for, and commitment to, creating a more equitable, diverse and inclusive workforce. Their efforts to meet with faculty and provide feedback and new ideas on how to cover these topics have resulted in what is quickly becoming a standard practice to assess and modify our courses. This is a story worth hearing.


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Enhancing Diversity and Inclusion Awareness - Through Interprofessional Field Exposures

 
Presenter(s):
Jean Gordon, University of North Carolina, Wilmington
Eric Richardson, University of North Carolina, Wilmington
Reid Oetjen, University of Central Florida
Dawn Oetjen, University of Central Florida
 
Session Description:
This session can be pivoted to an online format if needed. The session will be interactive, focusing on best practices for identifying local opportunities for increasing diversity awareness and interprofessional exposure.  Participants will recognize the importance of applied experiences in the development of student competencies in diversity awareness and interprofessional communication - while considering strategies for systemically integrating these experiences into the curriculum.
 

 
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Enhancing Inter-Faculty Communication using Visualization Tools to Enrich Competency Development and Assessment
 
Presenter(s):
Julie Agris, Stony Brook Medicine
 
Session Description:
Developed with Krista Gottlieb, Jeff Ritter, and Susan Somerville of Stony Brook Medicine, Dr. Agris will be providing a presentation on various tools that were developed to assist with inter-faculty communication and competency development and assessment. Stony Brook Medicine is part of an R1 academic institution including the Schools of Medicine, Dental Medicine, Nursing, Social Welfare, and Health Technology and Management. The Program in Public Health's Master of Health Administration and Master of Public Health in Health Policy and Management are uniquely situated to draw upon the established resources throughout the University, such as subject matter experts who serve as faculty members. As our programs developed, we identified opportunities to enhance inter-faculty communication of each other's content areas and competency development and assessment processes. We initiated this process with a valuable curricular concept map, and built upon this resource by developing course-specific visualization resources. We offer these tools to advance the important conversation of inter-faculty communication and competency development and assessment. 


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Global Healthcare Management Education: Pedagogical Innovations Using the BRIDGE Model

Presenter(s):
Daniel J.  West, University of Scranton
Ana Maria  Malik, Getulio Vargas Foundation
Steven  Szydlowski, University of Scranton
Bernardo Ramirez, University of Central Florida

Session Description:
This presentation provides applied examples of successful program and curriculum activities used with University and Community-Based partnerships in the Slovak Republic, Georgia, Mexico and Brazil.  The BRIDGE model provides sustainability to the healthcare management education (HME) university-based partnership initiatives.  The idea of using global development partnerships is examined within the context of graduate education.  Examples of curriculum-focused pedagogical partnerships activities are presented, along with public-private HME university and community-based initiatives.  Building Relationships In Developing and Growing Economies (BRIDGE) was a model developed under a USAID grant in Slovakia and expanded to Georgia and Mexico.  Current pedagogical enhancements have been implemented in Brazil.  Innovation and sustainable teaching, learning and research outcomes are presented.  Audience participation is expected in discussing other approaches to university-based HME partnerships and development of graduate education.  The session will utilize a panel of presenters from different country partnerships.  Part of the session uses PowerPoint along with video clips from various university-based partnerships in Slovakia, Georgia, Mexico and Brazil.  Audience participation will focus on reactions to public-private university-based partnerships and community activities, scholarly work, and use of the BRIDGE model in future global applications.  The session has relevancy for faculty engaged in global HME partnerships, and for faculty looking to expand pedagogical activities in curriculum and/or program development in graduate education. 

As a result of participating in the session, the learner will:  1. Understand the BRIDGE model as a scholarly global development strategy 2. Identify new HME initiatives to be used in global development partnerships 3. Establish contacts with colleagues who have global partnerships 4. Use pedagogical partnership activities and initiatives with students, faculty and community partners.

 

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Graduate Post-Acute Care Administration Specialization for achieving NAB HSE Accreditation
 
Presenter(s):
Gunjan Bansal, University of Scranton
Daniel West, University of Scranton
 
Session Description:
The demand of Post-Acute Care Administrators is increasing for taking care of chronically ill geriatric populations in Skilled Nursing Facilities, Residential Care / Assisted Living facilities, and post-acute care settings. The University of Scranton (UoS) MHA specialization in Post-Acute Care Administration will help achieve National Association of Long-Term Care Administrator Boards (NAB) accreditation, which only three graduate programs currently have in USA. This specialization will help UoS MHA program achieve Health Services (HSE) accreditation, which is the most comprehensive accreditation offered by NAB. Consequently, UoS MHA program will become first MHA program in USA to achieve NAB and HSE accreditations, second MHA program in USA and first MHA program in Pennsylvania to achieve NAB accreditation, and fourth graduate program in USA to obtain NAB accreditation.



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How Can We Transform Professionalism to Reflect Inclusivity?
 
Presenter(s):
Julie Robbins, The Ohio State University
Jeffrey Simms, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Paula Song, Virginia Commonwealth University
 
Session Description:
While many healthcare organizations publicly state diversity and inclusivity as a core value, there still remains a gap between these ideals and practice.  Standards of professionalism in the field maybe contributing to this gap. These standards are largely a vestige of the generation of leaders that established the field - typically white men - and reward conformance to a relatively narrow definition of professional behavior and success.  Leaders from three graduate programs will share their experience and then facilitate a shared dialogue to 1) identify ways that current professional standards may be undermining diversity and inclusion efforts, and 2) consider opportunities to advance more inclusive professional development approaches to support success among our increasingly diverse student population.


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How Can Your Learning Management System (LMS) Elevate Competency Assessment?

 
Presenter(s):
Alyssa Mansfield, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
Karen Volmar, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
Sue Boren, University of Missouri
David Moxley, University of Missouri
 
Session Description:
Many degree programs have embraced competency-based curricula. To be successful and meet accreditation requirements, student-level attainment must be evaluated and tracked. Effectively tracking this attainment is often complex and challenging. While competency tracking services/software are available for purchase, many programs may already have access to tools to track competencies effectively through their institution's learning management system (LMS; e.g., Blackboard, Sakai, Canvas). In this session, participants will learn how two programs use their web-based LMS to track and manage student competencies. In this highly interactive session, participants will gain insight into their LMS' potential, and the strengths and challenges of using these systems for competency tracking. Participants will also leave with the next steps needed to implement this approach within their respective institutions.
 

 
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Incorporating Ethics Lessons from the Pandemic Into Post-Pandemic Curricula
 
Presenter(s):
Michael Rozier, Saint Louis University
Julia Costich, University of Kentucky
Karen Volmar, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Kevin Valadares, University of Southern Indiana
 
Session Description:
The COVID-19 pandemic has given renewed attention to several important ethical concepts: resource allocation, as related to medical devices, medications, and vaccines; disparities and racial justice, as related to differences in infection, hospitalization, and mortality; caregiver well-being; financial vulnerability of delivery organizations; and more. Instructors have also been challenged to balance appropriate pedagogical rigor with compassion for students experiencing crises. This session will describe how pandemic-specific ethical concerns have been incorporated into undergraduate and graduate coursework since March 2020. It will then explain how the underlying concepts can be incorporated into post-pandemic coursework. This session focuses on ensuring that the ethical concerns that existed well before the pandemic, but that the pandemic made more acute, do not get lost once the pandemic has subsided.
 

 
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Innovation Among Executive Programs in Health Administration
 
Presenter(s):
Steven Howard, Saint Louis University
William Tuttle, University of Memphis
Banky Olatosi, University of South Carolina
Rhonda BeLue, Saint Louis University
 
Session Description:
The trend toward online, hybrid, and other alternative formats for health administration has increased rapidly, and the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated these shifts.  The number of programs designed to meet the needs of working professionals has grown dramatically among Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA) member programs over the past 10 years, and none are identical.  We interviewed program directors and other faculty from AUPHA-member executive health administration programs.  Subsequently, an online survey was developed and administered to program directors of all member programs.  The results demonstrate a high level of diversity among programs and highlight the innovative approaches programs have taken to meeting the needs of this growing market segment.  Comparisons are made to the results of the 2020 CAHME annual survey.
 

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Innovative Online Collaboration Models for Trans-Disciplinary and Cross-Culture Global Learning

Presenter(s):
Bernardo Ramirez University of Central Florida
Su-I Hou, University of Central Florida
Ana Luisa Desdier, Anahuac Puebla (Mexico) University
Iñaki Villanueva, Anahuac Puebla (Mexico) University
 

Session Description:
This  session introduces an innovative virtual education design model called Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL), to promote trans-disciplinary and cross-cultural Glocal scholarship. COIL extends authentic and cost-effective learning opportunities for students and faculty abroad and away and strengthen the glocalization of our curriculum, universities, and communities.  The panel will introduce the growing COIL design model in higher education, the value for our field, its defining characteristics and key success elements for implementation. Our international partners will share as a case study, how they have developed and taught with this modality, the impact in their internationalization strategies within the university and their community, their challenges and lessons learned. Finally, international comparisons will be introduced to explore the value chain and learning continuum of diverse delivering modalities of COILs.  The panel will exchange with the audience to find useful strategies to advance and collaborate using these and other mixed or onsite modalities to expand the curriculum globalization strategies in our field.  

This session will provide participants with new or additional ideas and concrete steps to initiate or enhance online collaborations and stimulate discussions to promote trans-disciplinary and cross-cultural Glocal learning in higher education across our field.  Format: Panel with case study discussion and interactive discussion with audience. 

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Introducing Co-production of Health: Transformative Public/Private Health Collaborations for Health Management
 
Presenter(s):
Rosemary Caron, University of New Hampshire
Anne Hewitt, Seton Hall University
 
Session Description:
This session highlights current co-production of health models grounded in a public health mission and population health approach.  The authors recommend the inclusion of co-production of health frameworks within a population health model to: 1.) assess the social, economic, and environmental indicators that contribute to one's health status via the community health assessment process; 2.) collaborate with diverse health-oriented and non-health oriented entities that operate in a socio-ecological framework; and, 3.) co-produce health with multiple stakeholders from an engaged community system who consider the upstream factors that the multi-component healthcare system helps to address.  Specific presentation topics include multi-faceted examples that illustrate new strategies, adapting new models of emerging organizational structures, differing types of collaborative relationships with private entities, and potential challenges with this approach.


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Launching a New Healthcare Executive Mentoring Program

Presenter(s):
Connie Evashwick George Washington University
April Pinner, Health Volunteers Overseas
Rhonda Belue, Saint Louis University

Session Description:

Under the "Delivery of Content" theme, this panel will describe a new pilot program to establish mentoring relationships between faculty of the Global Health Forum and 75+ hospitals and universities that partner with Health Volunteers Overseas (HVO). HVO is a 35-year-old non-profit organization dedicated to strengthening health worker capacity in resource-poor countries through clinical and didactic education,  consultation on academic programs and curricula, and train-the-trainer initiatives.

In recent years, HVO and its partners have recognized the need to provide training in management. HVO has been working with representatives of the Global Health Forum over the past year to develop the parameters for mentoring relationships. HVO recently surveyed its partners about their interest in management training and specific topics of priority. Of the 111 surveys administered, 52 responded, and of these, 31 expressed interest in management mentoring. HVO is considering launching a virtual program in 2021, with in-person opportunities to follow as travel restrictions are lifted.  Ms. April Pinner will present the background of HVO and the survey results. Dr. Rhonda Beleu will describe a health management mentoring experience with a colleague in Africa. Dr. Connie Evashwick will lead a brief discussion with Global Health Forum faculty on recommend features to include in Mentoring Guidelines that would articulate the expectations for mentors and mentees. Specific current opportunities will be shared, and those attending the session can follow-up to get more information about participating in the mentoring program pilot launch in Summer 2021.

Specific Learning Objectives:
1. Learn about new opportunities for mentoring healthcare executives in resource-constrained countries through Health Volunteers Overseas;
2. Consider the benefits and frustrations of mentoring healthcare executives; and  
3. Recommend elements to be included in Mentoring Guidelines to be used between HVO and the Global Health Forum member faculty 

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Lessons Learned from Hospitals Combatting COVID-19 Across the Eastern Mediterranean Region

Presenter(s):

Hamid Ravaghi
Merette Khalil
Awad Mataria


Session Description:
Hospitals play a key role in providing health services and essential medical care within health systems, particularly during crises. During rapidly evolving outbreaks, the provision of care is interrupted as hospitals around the world have become overwhelmed responding to COVID-19. In the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR), 2/3rd of countries face humanitarian emergencies, adding pressure to hospitals and health systems as they maintain essential services and respond to the pandemic. Now more than ever, policy makers and hospital managers are searching for context-specific evidence to strengthen their response to COVID-19.

This session will present the study findings of a mixed-methods analysis conducted by the WHO/EMRO on the hospital sectors’ experiences, challenges, interventions, and lessons learnt in combatting COVID-19 across the 22 EMR countries.


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Leveraging Interprofessional-Collaboration & the QM-Rubric to Deliver Health Administration Programs Amid COVID-19

 
Presenter(s):
Courtney Haun, Samford University
 
Session Description:
The purpose of this session will be to share perspectives on how interprofessional collaboration across faculty and departments can be leveraged to transition and transform academic programs that respond to specific obstacles and opportunities presented by COVID-19. Guiding the session, we will lean on the standards of the Quality Matters rubric as a foundational framework. The perspectives from the speaker and the audience will provide insights into the challenges presented by the shift from face-to-face to online instruction, impacts on student engagement, advising, and progression, faculty workload, departmental and school budgets, and how differing challenges became opportunities for innovation and interprofessional collaboration. Although academia has faced obstacles, these have been overcome and have become areas of opportunity by leveraging interprofessional teams.
 

 
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Mastering Pandemic Pedagogy: Department Perceptions of Teaching and Learning During the Pandemic
 
Presenter(s):
Kimberly Elliott, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler
Jessica Escareno, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler
Paige Powell, University of Memphis
Amy Landry, University of Alabama
 
Session Description:
This presentation will address both student and faculty perceptions about mode of delivery, quality and department culture as related to possible changes during the pandemic taken by MHA programs at three institutions which differ by; year established, state policy and student population.  The newest program is the University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler which has been delivered for 2 years. It was originally offered in a hybrid format with their first graduating cohort in the Fall of 2021.  The program at the University of Memphis (UofM) has been delivered for over 25 years and launched a fully online executive track in 2019. The third program at the University of Alabama (UAB) has been delivering graduate healthcare management education for approximately 55 years.
 

 
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New Members/First Time Meeting Attendees Overview

Presenter(s): 
Chris Sanyer, AUPHA


Session Description:
Join Chris Sanyer, Director of Management for the Association of University Programs in Health Administration, as she reviews AUPHA member benefits, the website and discussion Network, and what to expect during the upcoming Annual Meeting. 



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No Travel Required! - Pivoting to Virtual Internships

 
Presenter(s):
Reid Oetjen, University of Central Florida
Dawn Oetjen, University of Central Florida
Eric Richardson, University of North Carolina Wilmington
Dan Fisher, University of North Carolina Wilmington
 
Session Description:
This interactive session will explore experiential education - placing students in the field, helping them implement concepts and content learned in the classroom, and putting their knowledge into action.  The pandemic has limited these onsite experiences for students in health management programs.  Additionally, these experiences often pose a barrier for working students, especially those of color, juggling work and family.  Alternative projects and experiences are now needed so that students can continue to "learn by doing." In this session, discussion regarding the value of continuing virtual experiences after the pandemic to assist these students will be conducted. Participants will also be asked to share their programs' challenges and to brainstorm solutions to help students complete these experiential learning opportunities virtually.


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Program Planning in Uncertain Times

 
Presenter(s):
Karen Volmar, UNC Chapel Hill
Rhonda BeLeu, St. Louis University
Forest Kim, Baylor University
Jami Jones, Medical University of South Carolina
 
Session Description:
Program strategic planning is often constrained by institutional factors.  In the last year, the COVID pandemic created significant additional uncertainties at the institutional level that impacted both short and long term program-level planning activities.  Varied institutional approaches to uncertainty created different opportunities and barriers for programs.  This panel will speak to four programs' experiences continuing with program annual and strategic planning within their Universities' overall COVID response.  Panelists representing public and private Universities with varied student populations will share how decision-making structures, planning frameworks and timelines were altered due to COVID and the strategies to successfully position programs for the post COVID educational market.  In addition, the pandemic's effect and potential post-pandemic impact on teaching, internships, communication, professional development, safety and will be discussed.
 

 

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Public Health: Accelerating Innovation for a Better Nation

 
Presenter(s):
Jay Bhatt, DO, Chief Clinical Product Officer and Medical Director, Medical Home Network
 
Session Description:

In this keynote, Dr. Bhatt will outline lessons from COVID-19 and opportunities for innovation to position public health as a critical driver for growth in the health sector and better health. This will require analytics, data modernization, and high impact strategies to drive diversity, inclusion, and health equity. 

 

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Simulating Discrimination: A Safe Space to Learn the Harsh Realities of Healthcare
 
Presenter(s):
Stephan Davis, UNT Health Science Center
Arthur Mora, UNT Health Science Center
Karen Meadows, UNT Health Science Center
 
Session Description:
Simulation has been touted as a highly effective pedagogical tool to enhance problem-solving and communication skills. Since the 1960's, actors have been used to portray standardized or simulated patients to assess diagnostic capabilities and empathy. Our campus boasts state of the art live and virtual capabilities in support of clinical graduate programs in medicine, physical therapy, physician assistant studies, and pharmacy. Capitalizing on these resources, the MHA program has integrated video-based simulation as part of the curriculum to immerse students in ethically challenging scenarios to train and assess competency attainment.  This session will demonstrate the utility of video-based simulation for ethical issues that may be faced by future healthcare leaders.


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Sparking Creativity and Innovation Through Associational Thinking: Assignment on Concepts and Procedures
 
Presenter(s):
Armineh Zohrabian, University of Missouri
 
Session Description:
This session shares a teaching method involving a writing assignment to spark innovation and excellence in any field, e.g. healthcare policy or economics. This assignment increases student awareness of two types of knowledge: (1) conceptual, i.e. a connected web of knowledge in which the linking relationships are as prominent as the discrete pieces of information, and (2) procedural, i.e. consisting of discrete elements and rules.  By writing an essay, following the instructor's guidance, students focus on an activity or knowledge where they are exceptional, and how they applied conceptual and procedural knowledge to become exceptional. Students then associate that process with the learning process of new areas and subjects.  This approach is adapted to health management from mathematics (Sentilles and Wheeler (undated) and Hiebert (1986)).

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Steps Towards a New Undergraduate Curriculum in Digital Healthcare Management
 
Presenter(s):
Donald Zimmerman, University of New Orleans
Wendy Schluchter, University of New Orleans
Amanda Rosenzweig, Delgado Community College
 
Session Description:
The US healthcare system is rapidly transforming into a digital model of clinical care due to new internet-based technologies and capabilities. As these data-driven changes continue, healthcare employers have emphasized the need for a pipeline of new entry-level employees with team-ready skillsets in digital healthcare management.  There is a clear and urgent consensus within our region for undergraduate healthcare management programs to increase their academic focus on digital healthcare management. Yet, creating and incorporating these new program requirements into existing curricula are not easy or straight-forward tasks.   The goal of this session is to open-up a forward-looking discussion over how to best equip students with the knowledge, skills, and awareness needed to manage and lead digital healthcare organizations into the future.



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Systemic and Strategic: Fostering Diversity and Inclusion within the Connective Learning Environment
 

Presenter(s):
Eric Richardson, University of North Carolina, Wilmington
Reid Oetjen, University of Central Florida
Dawn Oetjen, University of Central Florida
Dan Fisher, University of North Carolina, Wilmington
 

Session Description:
This interactive session will explore opportunities for faculty to introduce, increase, or strengthen teaching and learning that intentionally supports diverse and inclusive communities in the classroom and beyond.  Session attendees will engage in an interactive discussion that focuses on best practices for connecting new information to what students already know from their previous home, community, and other related D&I experiences. It is important to note that diversity among students pursuing higher education continues to increase (Santangelo & Tomlinson, 2009), while instructional methods have largely remained unchanged. An increase in student diversity without innovative tools to address their unique needs is a breeding ground for problems.
 

 
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The Innovation Journey: Three Programs' Experiences Promoting Entrepreneurial and Intrapreneurial Thinking
 
Presenter(s):
Edward Schumacher, Trinity University
Patrick Shay, Trinity University
Steven Howard, Saint Louis University, College for Public Health and Social Justice
Chris Nesser, University of the Incarnate Word, HEB School of Business & Administration
 
Session Description:
This session will share the experiences of three programs at different stages of incorporating innovation in their curricula.  One program embarked on their "innovation journey" seven years ago, developing content and experiences across multiple courses that are embraced by students and the practitioner community alike.  Another program is at an earlier stage, working this year to actively promote innovation in their curriculum while connecting with a mentor program for guidance.  The third program does not focus on promoting innovation at a programmatic level, but individual faculty are incorporating innovation and entrepreneurship in their course content and projects. These three perspectives will be compared and discussed, offering valuable insights to participants regardless of what stage they or their program are currently navigating on their innovation journey.


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The Intersection of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion and Global Health Management

 
Presenter(s):
Rhonda BeLue, St Louis University
Jacqueline Wiltshire, University of South Florida
Lumbe Davis, St Leo University/CDC
Bernardo Rameriz, University of Central Florida
 
Session Description:
With the movement towards value based care, awareness of patients' cultural perspectives and backgrounds are crucial to providing high-value care. To improve the patient experience as well as population health, we cannot continue to ignore the need for cultural humility and responsiveness in healthcare. According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), global/intercultural fluency (value, respect, and learn from diverse populations) is a required competency for career readiness of today's graduates. However, global/intercultural fluency has not been traditionally or effectively integrated into most healthcare management education curricula. Global health management concepts and interactions can facilitate understanding of cultural humility and intercultural fluency. This session is a collaborative effort between the Cultural Perspectives Faculty Forum and the Global Health Management Faculty Forum.
 

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Transforming Global Health Curricula Delivery and Outcomes Using Innovative Business Models

Presenter(s):
Richard Greenhill, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

 
Session Description:
This session proposes two innovative models to assist educators invoke critical thinking around two items:

  • Evaluation of national health systems, agencies, and non-governmental organizations (NGO's)
  • Prototyping non-governmental organization (NGO) as start-ups The models to be presented are the Business Model Canvas (critical thinking and evaluation) and Lean Startup (prototyping NGO's).
The Business Model Canvas comes from the work of Alexander Osterwalder and is used to develop new as well as document existing business models. The Lean Startup invokes critical thinking around entrepreneurship and innovation in building a new organization. In both cases, these models will add tools to the global health educator toolbox, a new way to view global health education for programs, and innovative mental models for students.


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What's the Problem with Problem-Based Learning? A Fresh Look at Competency Development
 
Presenter(s):
John Fick, A.T. Still University / Siena Heights University
 
Session Description:
In this session, the presenter will share their experiences as a teaching faculty member in developing problem-based learning courses with the focus on competency development for graduate students.  This session will apply to those involved in designing and/or teaching courses in a traditional, blended, or online learning environment.  Also, a discussion regarding how to convert a content rich course, with little to no application, into a problem-based learning course, with strong and relevant application, will take place.  Finally, the presenter will discuss how their role has changed, as an educator, in the delivery of the problem-based learning course.


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Yoga Session: Hips Don't Lie
 
Presenter(s):
Julie Carmalt, PhD, Cornell University
 

Session Description:
Please be advised that this Zoom opens at 9:50am for pre-yoga coffee chat! Has pandemic sitting put a glitch in your hitch? Join us for 30 minutes of full-body flow with focus on opening and stretching hip flexors, quads, hamstrings, glutes, and lower back. No experience necessary to enjoy this tension releasing yet energizing flow. Ahhhh.



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Yoga Session: Leading with an Open Heart
 
Presenter(s):
Julie Carmalt, PhD, Cornell University
 
Session Description:

Please be advised that this Zoom opens at 9:50am for pre-yoga coffee chat! These 30 minutes of bliss will incorporate full-body traditional yoga poses with focus on expanding the heart-space and melting shoulders away from ears. Perfect for those of us who spend a lot of time hunched over a keyboard or who are craving reconnection with others. You’ll walk away feeling taller and freer and ready to embrace the day – and your loved ones – with an open heart. No experience necessary.