Session Descriptions


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A Content Analysis of Knowledge and Competency Requirements for MHA Administrative Fellowships

Session Description:
To assist graduate programs to better prepare future healthcare administrators, there is a need to identify the knowledge and competencies required by healthcare organizations for graduate administrative fellowship applicants. We extracted 188 unique healthcare administrative fellowship descriptions posted on the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE), the National Council on Administrative Fellowships (NCAF), and LinkedIn websites from June 1, 2021, through December 31, 2021. We then conducted a thematic qualitative analysis to identify the most frequently mentioned knowledge base and competency requirements. In addition, we also performed a sub-analysis on the most frequently mentioned credentials, certifications, and project assignments in the fellowship's job description. In this session, we will provide a comprehensive summary of our findings.

Presenters:
Nancy Borkowski, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Ganisher Davlyatov, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
Sidney Hiller, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
Valentina Vasquez, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

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A Method to the Madness: Effective Virtual Learning in Healthcare

Session Description:
Accelerated by the pandemic, momentum in the virtual learning space has grown exponentially in the past few years. Rooted in the reality of workforce shortages, budget cuts, and the desire for flexibility among learners and faculty, purveyors of education across the spectrum are facing an increasingly crowded and competitive virtual learning space. As we enter in to our next normal in healthcare education, virtual education will play a critical role in how we educate and train current and future healthcare leaders. Join the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE) for this engaging session on the who, what, where, when, and why of effective virtual learning in healthcare, including key insights from the faculty of one of ACHE’s most successful virtual programs.

Speakers:
Molly Lowe, American College of Healthcare Executives
Stephan Davis, Virginia Commonwealth University
Cristian Lieneck, Texas State University

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Academic Workplace Resilience and Optimization of Work Environment During and After COVID-19
 

Session Description:
The ongoing pandemic of COVID-19 was associated with significant changes in the way we practice healthcare management, research, and education. In this session, attendees will discuss ways to make academic institutions more resilient in the face of ongoing and future pandemics. With the increasing demand for employee-oriented work arrangements and sensitivity to personal needs, a growing number of workplaces, including universities, are considering or adopting flexible working arrangements (FWAs) for their employees. One of the key aims of this presentation will be to review published evidence focusing on FWAs in the industry and academic institutions to make recommendations about FWAs for academicians.  This session will also provide an overview of our innovative strategies in the education delivery and institutional preparedness that we practiced at Duquesne University.

Presenter:
Faina Linkov, Duquesne University


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Adding Business Plan Development to Your Graduate Curriculum

Session Description:
Most MPH and MHA programs require a capstone project that synthesizes coursework, culminating in a management consulting style project or policy paper. For 15 years, UCLA's Executive MPH in HPM has groups of three second-year students developing a viable business plan that is used as the group project across the strategy, marketing, and financial management courses in one term. The students formally present their "pitch" to a panel of seven external judges (who are kinder than Shark Tank), and, using their feedback from the panel, finish writing their plans. Many have gone on to be implemented and even sold. Come learn more about how our masters students employment opportunities are broadened when they realize that entrepreneurship, health-tech, and other unconventional opportunities are options.

Presenter:
Leah Vriesman, University of California, Los Angeles

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Addressing Health Inequities in Utah during COVID-19: From Research to Implementation

Session Description:
Since the earliest stages of the COVID-19 pandemic, Utah public health leaders recognized significant disparities between the majority white and ethnically diverse populations, trends that were mirrored nationally and that follow long-standing patterns of disparities. This panel will discuss how the field can better meet the needs of all communities and review steps the state took to address these disparities:

  • Forming a Multicultural Advisory Committee identifying short- and long-term strategies to reduce disparities
    Adapting strategies to meet community-specific needs
    Tracking data broken out by race to identify trends

This panel, moderated by Rand Kerr, will  include a cross-section of public health professionals engaged in reducing health disparities: secondary and primary research (Patricia Doxey); convening and advocacy (Nubia Pena); and community application (Jake Fitisemanu).

Presenters:
Patricia Doxey, Leavitt Partners
Jake Fitisemanu, Intermountain Healthcare
Rand Kerr, University of Utah
Nubia Pena, Governor Office of Utah

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Can Everybody Hear Me? Inclusion for Hearing Impaired Students

Session Description:
During the Covid pandemic, most learning sessions have moved to the virtual setting. The process of adapting to an online model has evolved from the first hurried days of merely transitioning live classroom-based materials and approach to accommodate the challenges and opportunities of the virtual environment. After nearly two years of academic adjustment to maximize the virtual approach for students, at the University of Washington MHA Program we identified a need to create a level playing field for hearing-impaired students as a matter of intentional design for our virtual classes. Join to learn more about it. Our focus includes both the in classroom and group study design to enhance the ability of hearing-impaired students to participate fully in all aspects of the Transformation in Healthcare course.

Presenters:
Molly Angel, Angel Change Management
Edward West, University of Washington


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Capstone Goes Virtual: The NYU Wagner Strategy Simulation for Community Health Systems

Session Description:
With the shift to online and hybrid education, the capstone challenge is how can we get students to have a robust integrative experience that demonstrates mastery of program competencies and acquisition of essential skills.  The New York University Wagner Strategy Challenge requires that students collaborate in virtual teams to think strategically, draw on evidence, and make trade-offs under time pressure and constraints.  During this session, we will demonstrate how student teams can compete to develop sound and sustainable strategies for their "healthcare institution" that supports human capital development and wellbeing and community service improvements in their market.

Presenters:
Benoit Calais, New York University/Mega Learning
Thomas D'Aunno, New York University Wagner
Carla Jackie Sampson, New York University Wagner


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Climate Change Fluency as a Competency for Future Healthcare Leaders

Session Description:
Climate change has been named the number one public health issue of the 21st century.   Based on that statement alone, health management education needs to consider how and where this can be accommodated within their curricula.   Participants in this session will gain a better understanding of the connection between climate and health and the relevance to healthcare organizations and professionals. This includes aspects of healthcare system preparedness and resilience in dealing with the impact of a changing climate and the healthcare system's carbon footprint and responsibility to reduce it. In addition, participants will learn about different approaches to incorporate this topic and content into a program and curriculum from the experience of four programs that have pursued different ways of addressing this important need.

Presenters:
Ryan Armbruster, University of Minnesota          
Santosh Basapur, Rush University
Richard Hirth, University of Michigan      
Robert Malte, University of Washington

 

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CommUNITY Cares - Lessons in Adaptive Response During the Pandemic

 

Session Description:
This session will address the resilience and agility displayed by public health staff and graduate program faculty supporting the CommUNITY Cares program piloted in a county in northeast Texas. The CommUNITY Cares program was designed to increase access to primary care providers for uninsured, low income, medically underserved patients presenting to either of two emergency departments at medical centers in a city of 100,000.  Patients meeting those criteria are referred by case managers for follow-up by a call center maintained by the public health district and eventual enrollment in a primary care home.  COVID challenged the original mission of CommUNITY Cares and delayed the cost-benefit analysis conducted by faculty, but a call center pivot to address COVID challenges in the community provided useful lessons learned.

 

Presenters:
Joy Johnson, Northeast Texas Public Health District
Michael Kennedy, University of Texas at Tyler Health Science Center
Morris Morris, University of Texas at Tyler Health Science Center


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Creating a Psychologically Safe Environment to Discuss Cultural Identity

Session Description
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Cultural Identity forms the lens through which we view the world and guides our interpretation of how others behave and interact.  In this highly interactive session, participants will complete an exercise based on the Bonnor Curriculum Identity Circles, which provides an opportunity to explore their own cultural background and discuss the various co-cultures to which they belong. During this session, presenters will share evidence-based methods for establishing a psychologically safe environment in which learners may share of themselves with authenticity and vulnerability and demonstrate cultural humility as they listen to others describe their own complex and multi-faceted cultural identities. Throughout the session, presenters will also model structured frameworks for leading debriefing conversations that promote reflection, offering tools participants can apply to effectively lead debriefing conversations within their own institutions.

Presenters:
Ashleigh Allgood, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Michelle Brown, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Leandra Celaya, University of Alabama at Birmingham

 

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Creating a Supportive and Inclusive Online Learning Environment

Session Description:
This session will provide an opportunity for participants to learn three opportunities to create or enhance an inclusive and supportive online learning environment in their courses. The three opportunities promote civil online learning environments, engage underprepared students in online learning, and help students persist in online learning. Several teaching practices (e.g., policies on classroom civility, identifying students’ prior knowledge, implementing instructional practices to support student success, offer additional support to meet students’ needs, demonstrating the connection between effort and performances, increasing students’ sense of belonging, and using choice when appropriate to increase persistence) will be reviewed, and applied examples of three teaching practices, including how to plan for and evaluate the success of each teaching practice, will be provided.

Presenter:
Sue Boren, University of Missouri


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Cross-Curriculum Management Simulations to Foster Learnings Around Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Session Description:
As the recent pandemic emerged, it was clear that the positive impact of experiential learning on student experience and learnings may be at risk. Over the past two years, alumni innovators alongside faculty have built a simulated market and large complex healthcare service organization sandbox. Additionally, we have created multiple scenarios within the simulation environment to foster DEI learnings.  The DEI scenarios are presented within scenarios covering Strategy, Information Technology, Management, Problem Solving, and Emergency Management.  We have found that DEI simulations are helpful to include within the market and organizational context that mirrors practice.  Join us as we share our journey in creating the sandbox and DEI simulations as well as foster a discussion.

Presenters:
Matt Anderson, University of Minnesota
Pradipta Komanduri, Process & Things, Seattle
Justine Mishek , University of Minnesota
Jake Rosenberg , Process & Things, Seattle

 

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Designing e-Portfolio Signature Assignments using  Gifs, Memes, and Sizzle Reels

Session Description:
By incorporating the use of electronic portfolio signature assignments, students can showcase that they possess competency in complex subjects. Join this session to learn about how creative assignments can showcase that a student is equipped to function in a technologically advanced, ever-changing environment.  By using a transparent assignment template for the following creative ePortfolio  assignments, GIFS, memes, and Sizzle Reels, instructors can ensure that students are aware of the requirements and competency to be attained. Thereby, students are able to demonstrate via creative means that they possess competence with respect to complex and sensitive subject matters while reinforcing their knowledge.

Presenter:
Carmen Saunders-Russell, California State University, Northridge


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Doctoral Capstone Projects: Completion Factors Considered

Session Description:
The number of students who successfully complete the didactic portion of their doctoral education and then end up being "ABD" is problematic not only for the students who do not successfully attain the degree, but to the doctoral program as well. Students in Health Administration doctoral programs tend to be current healthcare leaders. Hence failure to complete is counter to their own self-image and to their careers. This session will review a study designed to identify a personality type and/or motivation factors hypothesized to be aligned with or supportive of the cognitive demands posed by a doctoral dissertation. For this study, a retrospective questionnaire is used to capture self-reports from individuals who participated in doctoral health administration programs. Explanatory understanding of a failure-to-complete within doctoral health administration programs will be examined in details for all attendees.

Presenters:
Steven Berkshire, Central Michigan University
Asa Wilson, Southeast Missouri State University



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EHR Simulation - Bringing Technology to Life for Health Administration Students

Session Description:
The session will describe the use of EHRGO, an EHR simulation tool, in both health administration and health informatics graduate programs.  The study evaluated the impact the tool had on student learning and compared the success across the two graduate programs. As a result of this session, participants will be able to describe the reasons for using  EHR simulation  in non-clinical graduate programs, identify best practices for implementing an EHR simulation in graduate programs, and describe the skills and competencies students gained through the use of EHR implementation

Presenters:
Gail Marcus, Hofstra University
Mercado Mercado, Hofstra University



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Embracing Evidence in the Classroom:  Embedding Research into Teaching Practice

Session Description:
Healthcare management students' preparation for the "real world" can benefit greatly from integrating research evidence into their coursework. In this session, faculty from four graduate programs invite participants to consider ways that they might embed their own or others' research into their teaching. Panelists will start the session by sharing brief illustrations of how they incorporate evidence in a range of courses and then engage participants in a structured and generative dive into three main topics: 1) best practices for faculty to keep current on evidence; 2) challenges related to incorporating evidence into teaching and strategies for overcoming; and 3) novel approaches for incorporating evidence into teaching and student assessment.  This session will engage both research-active and teaching-focused instructors and identify unique challenges for each.

Presenters:
Jean Abraham, University of Minnesota
Jessica Mittler, Virginia Commonwealth University
Sean Nicholson, Cornell University
Julie Robbins, The Ohio State University

 

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Escaping Normality: Preparing Students to Break "Always Done It This Way" Mindset

Session Description:
This interactive session invites participants to experience a new, innovative way to engage students in the learning process while helping them develop key competencies necessary to become highly effective leaders.  Analytical thinking and strategic thinking have long been considered essential skills for healthcare leaders to successfully navigate an ever-changing environment and are critical for leaders to break out of the "we've always done it this way" mindset.  Through an escape room style learning approach, instructors can review important course material while giving students the opportunity to work either individually or in teams to solve difficult problems while developing key competencies.

Presenters:
Dan Fisher, University of North Carolina Wilmington
Jean Gordon, University of North Carolina Wilmington    
Dawn Oetjen, University of Central Florida
Eric Richardson, University of North Carolina Wilmington              

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Examining College and University COVID-19 Response and Influence of Relevant Faculty Expertise

Session Description:
College and universities have had to make difficult decisions on how best to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.  Higher education's response began as COVID-19 was an emergent crisis requiring public health expertise in epidemiology and infection control. In year three, the pandemic has in many ways morphed into an ongoing challenge requiring a balance of health and management principles that aligns more with the expertise of health administrators. In this session, we share insights from our previous work where the institutional presence of accredited public health schools and programs was found to be associated with instructional modality in the fall 2020 semester. Further, we will present new analysis to include institutional decision making in subsequent semesters at colleges and universities with CAHME-accredited and AUPHA-certified programs.

Presenters:
David Johnson, University of Louisville
Sarah Walsh, Eastern Michigan University



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Experience is the Best Teacher: Crossing the Virtual Chasm with Classroom Activities

Session Description:
Many educators find themselves struggling to translate their classroom activities into the virtual classroom setting. Much effort has focused on developing dynamic and engaging classroom activities that enhance the student learning experience, knowledge retention, and competency development. The key question is how can those activities be translated into a synchronous online environment?  This session will present various techniques currently in use in one MHA program's courses. Participants will engage in both an in-person and online class activity to compare the experience. They will also share in compiling a toolbox of other approaches and tools to apply in the online environment. It is recommended that participants bring their own laptops if they are able.

Presenters:
Lynn Downs, University of the Incarnate Word
Chris Nesser, University of the Incarnate Word

 

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Experimenting and Failing Fast: The Simplest Way to Innovate your Teaching

Session Description:
Bringing innovation to our teaching does not have to be difficult or time-consuming! This Deep Dive session will share a systematic methodology for the development of engaging teaching activities and assessments, especially in transitioning teaching environments. Fostering courageous creativity in the classroom, we will share a step-by-step approach incorporating mindsets and principles from Design Thinking and Lean methodologies, including Design Thinking's encouragement of creative, empathy-driven problem solving as well as the useful tools for simplifying innovation offered through Lean. By combining these approaches and incorporating tips and exercises for creative experimentation, this session will assist and streamline instructors' efforts to experiment in their classrooms, helping them tap into their creativity, curiosity, and courage as health administration educators.

Presenters:
Zachary Pruitt, University of South Florida – Tampa
Patrick Shay, Trinity University

 
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Fade to White: How Diversity Withers From College to the Corner Office

Session Description:
Bachelors and Masters Health Administration programs have yielded more diverse graduating classes than the general population for decades, yet this increased supply of diversity is not readily apparent in the health administration workforce, which remains less diverse than the general population.   Although new graduates enter the workforce every year and the overall workforce population grows, it does not grow proportionally to the race/ethnicity distribution of the graduates. We calculated detailed race/ethnicity/gender estimates for health administration workforce entry, retention, and turnover using IPEDS and BLS data from 2011-2020.   We have found, for example, 29% of the new positions resulting from workforce growth were filled by Hispanic administrators.  In contrast, Black and Asian administrators were twice as likely to separate from the workforce compared to White administrators. Join us as we further explore and discuss this topic.

Presenter:
Jonathan DeShazo, Virginia Commonwealth University


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Five Years Later: Integrating Systems Thinking and Organizational Learning into MHA Curricula

Session Description:
In 2016, the MHA@GW degree program taught for the first time a course dedicated to systems thinking and organizational learning in healthcare. As the capstone course in the program, this course was designed to help students develop the competencies necessary to lead their organizations into an unknowable future. A survey was recently sent to program alumni who completed this course to obtain their assessment of the utility of the content taught and how this class has informed their practice as health sector leaders. This session reports on the results of the survey and provides participants with practical recommendations on how systems thinking and organizational learning can be implemented in their own programs.

Presenters:
Leonard Friedman, The George Washington University
Andrew Wiss, The George Washington University

 

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Generating Strategies for Incorporating DEIB&SJ into Core Courses: A Collective Effort

Session Description
:
The last two years have created unprecedented experiences for students due to stressors from COVID, social protests, and their own personal academic journeys. These heightened ordeals resulted in new and challenging environments that emphasize the criticality of growing leadership competencies and standards of professionalism. It is imperative that students have a safe classroom environment to express, discuss, and debate these social justice issues. These crucial conversations set the stage for students to begin understanding the complex impact found in today's dynamic healthcare settings. Using three separate core courses, three experienced educators share personal stories and facilitate dialogue for generating strategies to navigate uneasy, but critical, dialogue. Attendees will leave the session with a plan for action to implement in their own classroom setting.

Presenters:
Lorena Bailey, Army-Baylor University   
Lynn Downs, University of the Incarnate Word
Alan Jones, University of the Incarnate Word

 

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Inclusive Leadership Education: A New Paradigm for Healthcare Management Andragogy

Session Description:
Inclusion is defined by the Association of American Colleges and Universities in part as "the active, intentional, and ongoing engagement with diversity — in the curriculum, in the co-curriculum, and in communities.” In this session, participants will examine recommended practices to foster inclusion and increase diversity in health professions learning environments. Additionally, preliminary findings from the national survey of AUPHA members to evaluate faculty and academic leader perspectives and practices related to diversity and inclusion will be reviewed. Based on the findings and recommendations from healthcare management faculty, examples of inclusion practices and outcomes from two institutions will be discussed.

Presenters:
Stephan Davis, Virginia Commonwealth University
Carla Sampson, New York University
Paula Song, Virginia Commonwealth University

 

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Innovations in Teaching Population Health: Trends Mandate Increased Coverage in Graduate Curricula

Session Description:
The dynamic healthcare landscape has led to increased sophistication about how healthcare organizations should approach population health management. Consequently, healthcare management programs must teach about public health, community health, social determinants of health, cultural competence, equity of access, systems integration, and diversity, equity, and inclusion among health professionals. Implementation of population health management payment systems, such as ACOs and bundled payment systems, and outreach programs, such as telehealth, must be built upon a solid understanding of the broader community and its distribution of resources.  This session examines recent trends, ranging from changes in societal attitudes to healthcare technology to public health knowledge requirements mandated by CEPH, and discusses how new or enriched topics are essential for the training of future healthcare executives.

Presenters:
Rosemary Caron, University of New Hampshire 
Connie Evashwick, Consulting & Evaluation Associates   
Anne Hewitt, Seton Hall University          
Carleen Stoskopf, South Dakota State University

 

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Introducing a Digital Strategy for Health Administration and the 21st Century Workforce

Session Description:
As business and industry continue to settle into the 21st century, the next generation of students must be aptly prepared to work productively in a transformative and digital healthcare environment. Balancing course work with digital badges can add value to the post-secondary experience and directly impact the quality of talent moving from college into the workforce. This session will provide an overview of strategy to implement digital badge credentials for FranU. The digital badge offers students the opportunity to build capabilities and industry-recognized skills in selected areas of healthcare. The overview will explain the process for identifying talent gaps in labor market, selecting skills for badges, securing university approval, and marketing the program. In addition, badges in Supply Chain Management, Enterprise Risk Management and an Excel series will be discussed. 

Presenters:
Pearce Cinman, Franciscan Missionaries of Our Lady University (FranU)
Elaine Purdy, Franciscan Missionaries of Our Lady University (FranU)

 

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Keeping it Relevant: Two Programs’ Experiences Incorporating HFMA Professional Certification Content

Session Description:
This session presents the experiences of two graduate level health administration programs  utilizing course content developed by the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA) as part of their professional certification programs. Student and faculty assessments of the use and value of the asynchronous online education modules from the first stage of the Certified Healthcare Finance Professional and the Certified Revenue Cycle Representative course are presented. Lessons learned, over a two-year period, on implementing HFMA professional certification courses within graduate level finance classes are presented. A discussion of resources available from HFMA will also be presented by HFMA's Director for Partnership Relations. We will conclude with a group discussion of topics covered and the role of academic professional society partnerships in developing future healthcare leaders.

Presenters:
Michele McGowan, Kings College
Michael Morris, University of Texas at Tyler Health Science Center
Todd Nelson, Healthcare Financial Management Association



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Key Competencies and Skills for Health Services Administration Graduates Entering the Workforce

Session Description:
The purpose of this presentation is to share a cross-sectional survey of and key informant interviews with hiring managers and leaders to understand the competencies and skills most valued and to create informed recommendations for programs designed to assist early career professionals (ECPs) in public health and health services administration with competency building and job attainment. Recommendations were also created regarding undergraduate and graduate healthcare administration program design based on identified needs and gaps for introductory health services managers.  As background, in early 2021, over 1100 health service administrators and hiring managers were surveyed and 45 key informant interviews were conducted to capture the opinions of these leaders and managers regarding key skills in the workplace for early careerists and readiness to hire graduates of healthcare administration programs.

Presenter:
Ashley Parks, Appalachian State University

 

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Law to Practice: How One University Operationalized a Pathway to Work Readiness

Session Description:
Collaboration among career center administrators, faculty, academic advisors, and university administrators is key to performance funding institutions because they will either thrive or meet their demise in the performance funding environment.  In Florida, House Bill 1261 Section 2 addresses State University Career Planning and information.  Enacted in 2021, it is a law designed to help students and families in making better-informed decisions about educational options and future employment opportunities in which the Board of Governors of the State University shall publicly publish an online dashboard.  Considering the needs of various stakeholders, the presenter will discuss one university's approach to operationalizing a law into practice while bringing awareness to students about their employment and wage prospects as a pathway to work readiness.

Presenter:
Pia Woodley, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

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Leveraging Practitioner Faculty to Foster Innovation in Healthcare Management Education

Session Description:
Academic-practice partnerships and the integration of practitioner faculty are essential for high-quality learning experiences for health administration students. Despite this, the role of practitioner faculty is inconsistently understood in the academy. At the same time, practitioners often find it challenging to navigate academic culture and processes. During a time of growing faculty shortages, challenges with recruiting diverse educators, and emerging competencies for the field, practitioner faculty should be considered as part of the solution. Additionally, for meaningful experiential learning opportunities, relationships with practice sites are essential, an area where practitioners are often uniquely positioned to contribute. This session will focus on models for leveraging practitioner faculty to support innovation and creativity related to emerging competencies, foster academic-practice partnerships, and increase faculty diversity.

Presenters:
John Buckley, Texas A&M University
Stephan Davis, Virginia Commonwealth University
Robbya Green-Wair, Florida A&M University


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Making a Regional Case for Optimal Telemedicine Investment: From Clinic to Classroom

Session Description:
The pandemic has seen a large-scale introduction of telemedicine across various medical specialties, facility types, and patient populations. Telehealth services can greatly expand access to care during and beyond the pandemic, keep vulnerable patients safe during quarantine or disease surges, and have been used effectively in some specialties, (e.g., telepsychiatry). In some specialties and regions, the decision to introduce telehealth programs is not clear cut from a central planning perspective, either because of provider supply, relative size, distribution or composition distribution of patient pool, or local/regional/state policies that impose burdensome restrictions. This session will outline a machine learning modelling approach to predict promising regions for introducing telemedicine by specialty, and walk through a companion modelling exercise that can be used with students in the health classroom.

Presenter:
Hengameh Hosseini, University of Scranton

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Making Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Promotion and Tenure Decisions Visible

Session Description:
Academic units have encouraged faculty to report DEI contributions to research, teaching, and service on annual reports. However, it is critical to integrate DEI into the tenure and promotion process. This session will highlight DEI guidance for promotion committees, and on whether or not and how to evaluate such contributions;more importantly, how the department leadership can work with faculty in their career growth with a clear DEI plan. Using the plan will improve the contributions that faculty can make to supporting their success in tenure and promotion.

Presenter:
Lizheng Shi, Tulane University

 

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Pandemic Pivot: Revisiting Academic Integrity Strategies to Ensure Student Success

Session Description:
The dramatic impacts of COVID-19 have challenged faculty to retool course delivery models, pivot to new student engagement efforts, and develop more robust technology tools to ensure student success. With the massive and sudden pivot to remote learning, promoting a culture of academic integrity is a top priority. This presentation will address a cross department collaborative pilot that refocused both faculty and students on the importance of academic integrity. The pilot included the development of standardized faculty and student training, the implementation of consistent course tools and messaging, validation and tracking of student and faculty training completion, and evaluation strategies of student experience. The successful pilot is expanding to the institutional level for optimization and standardization of existing approaches to academic integrity and student success.

Presenters:
Kimberly Elliott, University of Texas at Tyler, Health Science Center
Jessica Escareno, University of Texas at Tyler, Health Science Center

 

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Quality Matters Template for Undergraduate Courses: A Competency Mapping Strategy

Session Description:
In a time when online learning and competencies-based education models are becoming more prevalent, programs need to design a standardized competency-based template such as Quality Matters for the online courses to ensure that they are all in the same format and present learning objectives and competency mapping the same way. We will share our experience at the University of North Florida (UNF) on how to help faculty with their online courses to make student learning easier.

Presenters:
Hamadi Hamadi, University of North Florida
Jeffrey Harrison, University of North Florida
LaRee Moody, University of North Florida
Mei Zhao, University of North Florida

 

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Rapid Telehealth Gaps, Barriers and Opportunities

Session Description:
Join this session to learn more about these recent efforts in telehealth and associated acitivites. During the pandemic the need for telehealth education for clinicians, faculty and students became apparent. The transformation and need required providers to learn telehealth rapidly with a high in 2020 and now stabilizing around just under 40%. Similarly, both provider and consumer view points towards telehealth have improved. Even though some barriers need to be addressed, telehealth is here to stay and has seen greatest use in certain specialties such as psychiatry, endocrinology, rheumatology and gastroenterology. Barriers have been eliminated for women and under-served communities by overcoming distance and time through televisits and telehealth.

Presenter:
Iris Zachary, Missouri University

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Rethinking Hiring: Promising Practices to Support Equity

Session Description:
With the "great resignation," programs are and will be engaging in higher numbers of faculty searches.  As institutions focus on providing more equitable and inclusive environments for students, faculty and staff, many departments are rethinking hiring practices. In this session, panelists will share experiences at two public Universities implementing comprehensive strategies to improve equity in hiring across organizations. Both institutions have implemented search advocacy practices and instructor pool approaches to improve equity in hiring practices for both full-time and adjunct faculty.  Presenters will discuss specific changes to recruitment efforts and search processes to support a diverse workforce, reflect on the changed experience of search committees and applicants as well as discuss strategies for overcoming institutional and cultural barriers to improving faculty and staff searches.

Presenters:
Susan Helm-Murtagh, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Kristin Reiter, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Karen Volmar, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Ciara Zachary, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill



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The Collaborative Competency Model: Development, Measurement, Validity, and Application

Session Description:
Competencies were introduced as an accreditation requirement by CAHME in 2008. Since then, a competency model has been collaboratively developed, validated, and continuously updated through a partnership of the graduate programs of Medical University of South Carolina, Trinity University, University fo Alabama at Birmingham, and Virginia Commonwealth University. Such collaborative efforts are rare and offer potential for achieving better results than could be achieved independently. To date, there is still limited evidence of healthcare management competency models that have been empirically validated through longitudinal analyses that demonstrate causal relationships between measured competencies and the degree of management performance or organizational effectiveness at some future point in a student's career trajectory. This session will review the methods employed by the collaborative, which have produced the next best level of competency validity in the absence of demonstrated causal relationships over time.

Presenter:
Stephen O'Connor, University of Alabama at Birmingham



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The New Frontier: Grading Writing AND Enjoying It!

Session Description:
No matter what level of students or what the course is about, grading writing in addition to content is a challenge for many faculty.  How do we balance providing our students with feedback on the writing quality itself that they will find useful, while simultaneously focusing on the content of the course and not losing ourselves in the process? In this session, we will explore how using tools like Grammarly and video feedback can streamline the process, improve the student experience, and make grading fun again for faculty!

Presenter:
Sarah Kercsmar, University of Kentucky


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Thinking Outside the Box for Program Assessment Design Using Canvas Competency Rubrics

Session Description:
Do you have a systematic way of assessing students on competencies for your healthcare management program? Wouldn't it be nice to have quantitative data to look at each time you are preparing for a self-study or an assessment report? Proper program assessment design is a key to program evaluation, student self-assessment, and accreditation needs.  This session will showcase how the University of Nevada, Las Vegas' Masters of Healthcare Administration program instituted an assessment design within the learning management system, Canvas, to help build competency-based rubrics using the outcomes tool.  During the session, participants will first look at the UNLV assessment design process over the last two years, review student competency results, potential improvements in the design, and learn how they can create their own assessment design with some takeaway job-aids and example rubrics!

Presenters:
Nicole Espinoza, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Erin Rosenberg, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

 

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Tools/Apps used to Track Student Progress and Competency Attainment

Session Description:
This session will demonstrate the use cases of different tools/apps we use to monitor student progress, improve faculty-student communication, and streamline the competency assessment in three graduate programs: a) an online program; b) an in-person program with traditional student body; and c) an in-person program with the non-traditional student body. We will further discuss the pros and cons (e.g., cost, ease of use, interoperability with an existing learning management system, student/faculty experience with their use, etc.) of different in-house versus third-party tools/apps.

Presenters:
Ganisher Davlyatov, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center        
Amy Landry, University of Alabama at Birmingham
William Opoku-Agyeman, University of North Carolina Wilmington
Eric Richardson, University of North Carolina Wilmington              

 

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Undergraduate Certification Ignite Session

Session Description:
During this session, attendees will hear from several participants of the most recent AUPHA Undergraduate Certification Cycle. They will share their experiences and lessons learned as they went through the effort, such as  Self-Studies. Join us to learn about the diversity of programs going through the process, general strengths and areas of improvement identified during Self-Studies, and what participants felt might help programs interested in go through the certification process.

 

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UNLV RebelFlex: Half the students participating online-real time and half in class

Session Description:
Our HCA 402 Quantitative Management for Health Care Organizations and Predictive Analytics course is taught with half the students joining online, real time using WebEx; while half the students meet in the classroom. To assist this set up, we have special tools, microphones, and a paid student assistant to keep the online students engaged using items such as a "document camera" to show and draw charts, graphs, and formulas to WebEx and in class at the same time. In addition, we have students participate as individuals and in teams in quick and larger project assignments and complex Excel models such as control charts and reengineering Lean Six Sigma methods. Join this session to learn more about these engagement methods, tools, and resources.

Presenter:
Chris Papesh, University of Nevada, Las Vegas  

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